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Transcript

Only used for admin purposes

Matching 8D

Now, what should you pack? The information sheet tells you a lot about what clothing to bring ... but what about other things? Well, Tamerton House has its own small shop, but anything bigger is several miles away so you won’t have many opportunities for buying supplies. So in this last part of my talk, I’m going to explain what objects you should take with you to the Centre, what you can take if you want and also, very importantly, what you cannot take.

Several of you came up to me before this talk and asked whether you can take things like kettles, or hairdryers. The answer is, there are plenty of these electrical appliances available in the Centre and they are of the proper voltage and are checked regularly. Yours may not be, so the rules at Tamerton say you can’t bring them into the Centre ... because it’s considered a fire risk ... remember it’s a very old house. Now, another question was about cell phones. Although you definitely can’t have them on during inside talks, you equally definitely need them when you’re out on exercises ... so they’re a must, I’m afraid. Anybody who wishes to talk to me about borrowing a phone for the fortnight, please see me after this talk.

Now, the weather’s heating up at the moment and you’ll be outdoors a great deal. If you wear proper clothing, especially a hat, sun cream is optional. Also they sell high-factor cream in the shop so you don’t have to take any of your own, unless there’s a special kind you use. Now there’s a special note about things like deodorants which come in aerosol cans - I need to tell you that these are banned in the Centre because apparently they have the habit of setting off the fire alarms. If you want to take an aerosol can, you’ll actually be at risk of being told to leave.

And finally, people having been asking about whether they need to take towels. Well, the Centre does provide one towel per guest, which you’re required to wash yourself. If you’re happy with that then don’t bring another. If not, take one of your own. Just remember how much outdoor exercise you’ll be doing ... and how dirty and wet you’ll be getting ...

 

Matching 7D

Ok. Let me tell you the different tracks around here. All of them start at the end of Mountain Road - and you can find a parking lot there where you can leave your vehicles. Let’s start with North Point track. It’s a gentle route through lowland forest – good for biking and probably the one for you if you have small children. There’s a wooden hut where you can stay at the end of the track but be aware that it’s really just an overnight shelter, and you’ll need to take your own sleeping bags and cooking equipment. Another option is the Silver River track. As the name suggests, you’d be following the river for most of the way, and you get to see some of our beautiful native birds, but the track also goes through a densely-forested area. Unfortunately, the signposting isn’t very good in places and you do need good map-reading skills to avoid becoming disoriented, which happens to visitors a little too frequently, I’m afraid. Valley Crossing will take you through some stunning scenery but there are several points along the way where you’ll need the level of fitness required to get over some pretty big rocks. Stonebridge is one of the shortest tracks but very steep as it takes you up to the water fall, and you do need to be in good condition to manage it. Lastly, the Henderson Ridge track will take you all the way to the summit of the mountain. Do bear in mind, though, that at this time of year the weather is very changeable and if the cloud suddenly descends, it’s all too easy to wander off the track. It’s best to check with us for a weather report on the morning you think you want to go. On the way to the summit, there’s a hotel which provides comfortable rooms and quality meals, so it’s worth climbing all…

Matching 6D

Some of you may be interested to know the the library is offering specialised training sessions on writing a dissertation. Obviously, this is not relevant to those of you who are undergraduates. It is just for postgraduates. Your department will discuss the planning stage of the dissertation – i.e. what going to do – with you, and we will focus on the structure of it. However, the training will also include some time on the computers. I realise most of you know how to organise files but we can show you the different ways to run data programmes. Your tutors will tell you at the outset how to set out the chapters they require but you will need to ask them how they would like you to organise the bibliography because it varies depending on your subject area. When you’ve got something together the trainer here will look throug the draft version for you to see if it’s OK. And, one final point, for those of you who have registered from abroad, we can offer individual sessions on dissertations if you feel you need them. If you require language lessons then they are available from the International Centre next to the Law Department.

Matching 4D

Good morning and welcome, everybody. I’m Jenny Stewart and I’m the staff manager here at the exhibition centre. We’re expecting this year’s International Travel Exhibition to attract over 10,000 visitors a day, ladies and gentlemen, and you are among the two hundred extra staff recruited to help look after them. Now, to help things run smoothly , we have divided you into four teams – the blue team, the green team, the red team, and the yellow team. So first I’ll explain how the teams are divided up, and then we’ll be giving you colour-coded T-shirts so we can identify you more easily.

First of all, those who will be looking after the phones and handling all calls regarding the exhibition, you will be on the red team. Now, we’ve also put the entrants staff on the red team and you’ll be stamping the entrance tickets and giving out publicity leaflets, OK?

Those of you involved in distributing entrance tickets will be on the yellow team and we’ve also put those of you who’ll be staffing the information booths around the conference centre on the yellow team, so you’ll be getting a yellow T-shirt.

Now, most of the hospitality staff have been put in the blue team, so the shifts among you and the kitchen hands will all need a blue T-shirt, but, because of the sheer numbers, all waiting staff will be on the yellow team, and this includes the bar staff among you.

Those who will be monitoring and directing the traffic in the car parks are on the green team, so you’ll need to get a green T-shirt. This year we’ve also employed a considerable number of attendants to direct the human traffic around the conference centre. Now, you’ll be working in the exhibition hall at all times, giving directions and generally helping people whenever you can, and you will be in the red team, so please collect a red T-shirt.

Matching 1D

MAN: And here on Radio Rivenden we have Lynne Rawley, the Public Relations Officer of our own Rivenden City Theatre. Hello, Lynne.
LYNNE: Hello.
MAN: Now, the theatre is reopening soon after its three-year redevelopment programme, isn’t it?
LYNNE: That’s right, and there are a lot of improvements. The first thing people will see when they go in is that the foyer has been repainted in the original green and gold. Then the box office has been reoriented, with its own access from the side of the building instead of through the foyer, which means it can be open longer hours, and has more space, too.
The shop that used to be in the foyer, which sold books and CDs, is the one part of the redevelopment which isn’t yet complete. The plan is to find new premises for it near the theatre, and we’ve had difficulty finding somewhere suitable. We hope to reopen the shop in the next few months.
MAN: Will audiences find any difference in the auditorium?
LYNNE: Yes, we’ve increased the leg-room between the rows. This means that there are now fewer seats but we’re sure audiences will be much happier. And we’ve installed air conditioning, so it won’t get so hot and stuffy.
We already had a few seats which were suitable for wheelchair users, and now there are twice as many, which we hope will meet great demand. Something else that will benefit audiences is the new lifts. The two we used to have were very small and slow. They’ve now gone, and we’ve got much more efficient ones.
MAN: Anything for the performers?
LYNNE: Yes, we’ve made a number of improvements backstage. The small, dark dressing rooms we used to have have been converted into two large airy rooms, so they’re much more comfortable now. And the state-of-the-art electronic sound and lighting systems have been installed.

List selection L - Practice 8D

Student: I expect it will take me a while to find what I need. There’s such a lot here

Librarian: Yes, there is. But if you need help getting started, this term we are running three study skills workshops.

Student: Oh? What are they on?

Librarian: Er…Let me see.. The first one’s on resources. Yes, here it is. How to use the library’s resources. That includes everything, not just the print and other technical resources.

Student: That sounds useful. Is there anything about how do use the Internet?

Librarian: Er..Let see. The one on the Internet for beginner was last term. This term it’s on finding research material online.

Student: That sounds interesting, too. What’s the last one?

Librarian: It’s the workshop on dissertation.

Student: What do you mean? How to write one?

Librarian: No. It’s more to do with academic writing conventions, you know, writing bibliography, how to refers to sources in your text, that sort of things. Anyway, here’s the leaflet with the information about all three.

Student: Thanks a lot. That would be very useful.

Librarian: You’re welcome

 

Vocabulary:

  • dissertation (noun): luận văn
  • academic writing conventions: các quy cách trong trình bày bài viết học thuật

 

List selection L - Practice 7D

Customer: Thanks. And are there lots of places to go to around here?

Railperson: Oh..Yes. You can enjoy many days out. And there’s the Merthyr mining museum, which is only half an hour from Trebirch by train. Children will find it as fascinating as any theme park and they can ride in the original miner’s lifts and the coal trains. There are special excursion tickets which include entrance fees. Mainline trains also offer direct services to Bristol, where you can visit the docks or spend a great day out with the children in the zoo, which is set in the parkland that used to surround the old castle. Special family away-day fares are available for this service now during the school holidays. Alternatively, you can be in Birmingham in only an hour and a half, where there’s lots to see and do including the new and internationally-acclaimed climbing wall built on the side of the old aquarium. We will also be running a special service to Newport when the new science museum opens next year, as we anticipate a lot of visitors in the opening weeks, I’d advised you to call early to book your tickets. Is that OK?

Customer: Yes, thanks.

Section 2 - Practice 7

Welcome to the Selmore Public Library which as just been reopened after major refurbishment. This tour will introduce you to the building and its services. At any time you can stop the tour. We enter by the café and our tour begins at the issue desk.

If you stand between the information dest and the issue desk and look at the opposite wall, you will see shelves of book in the left-hand corner. (11) This is where you will find a large number of novels and short stories.  They are arranged alphabetically. If you’re looking for something in particular and it’s not on the shelf you can reserve it. The next area, directly opposite the issue desk, (12) is a section where people can study. The library provides computers for users free of charge on the next floor beside the reference books but this area is for people to use their own laptops. You should ask for the internet passcode at the information desk.

In the right-hand corner of this floor there is a café. A selection of daily newspapers is always available there but you can also take magazines into the café to read while you have a drink. (13) You will find these on the racks to the left of the café and there is a large selection. They are for reference only and cannot be borrowed but you are welcome to photocopy any articles of interest. We ask you fiction or any other books from the shelves into the café.

Next to the café is the exit door leading to the stairs and escalator to the other floors. The largest collection of books in the library is fiction (14)  and the next largest is non-fiction which is in the corner of this floor opposite the café.  These can all be borrowed as opposed to the reference books on the next floor, most of which cannot be taken out of the library – but they can be photocopied. There are several photocopiers available for this purpose downstairs in the basement. To one side of the issue desk is a door leading onto a gallery. This was added to the library as a public space where talks are given once a week on a Saturday by visiting authors of both fiction and non-fiction. (15) It also houses the biography section. There are notices advertising the talks in the study area.

Any books that you want to borrow should be taken to the issue desk. Before we leave this floor I will give you some information about using the library. There are also helpful notices by the information desk.

To join the library and take books out, you need a membership card. Take your passport or identity card, as well as proof of your home address, to the information desk and you will be issued with a card. (16)  After a period of two years, all readers are required to go to the desk with a document that has their name and current address on it so the library can keep up-to-date records of where people are living. There’s no charge for this but any lost cards are charged at £5.

If you can’t find the book you want on the shelves, you can reserve it. If it’s in another library in the city, we can usually get it for you within a week. If someone else has borrowed it, it can take a few weeks. (17) Either way, we notify you by phone or email when the item is available to be picked up.  We will hold it for you for five days.

Books can be borrowed for fourteen days and can be renewed for a further two weeks. Children’s books also have a two-week borrowing period. The same system exists for CD-ROMs and CDs but (18) DVDs, both children’s and adult’s, can only be borrowed for up to seven days. It isn’t possible to renew them. Some reference books can be borrowed but normally only for one day, so 24 hours.

The library opening hours have been changed slightly. Instead of opening late on Wednesday evenings till 8PM, we will be closing at 6, as on other weekdays, (19) but we will close at 7 instead of 5.30 on Saturdays and a new development – we are going to open on Sunday mornings from next month – 9 to 1. We are closed on public holidays and notices are posted in the library about these.

Before you go upstairs, please note that if you are going to the exhibition area on the third floor, large bags are not allowed. (20) There are lockers beside the reference area on the second floor where you can deposit them. If you need change, you can get that from the information desk on the first floor.

Now press ‘pause’ and proceed to the second floor. When you reach the top of the stairs press ‘play’.

Matching 9D

Ok. Moving on. Unfortunately, there’s been increase in the number of minor crimes and antisocial behaviour in a general area. And I want to talk about some specific prevention measures that are being proposed.

First of all, the skate park. As you probably know, it’s well used among younger people in our community, but unfortunately we are getting more and more reports of broken glass, making it especially dangerous for younger children. One possile solution here is to get rid of some of the trees and bushes around the park, making it more visible to passers-by and vehicles. If the vanes all known that they are being watched, this might act as a deterrent.

As you would have heard, a couple of local primary schools have also been vandalized recently despite the presence of the security guards. The schools don’t have the fund for video surveillance, so we need people in the neighborhood to call their nearest police station and report any suspicious activity immediately. Please don’t hesitate to do this.

I expect most of you are familiar with the problems facing Abbotsford Street. It seems that no amount of warning signs or speed cameras will slow speeding drivers down. I’m happy to say, however, that the council had a cree to begin work over the next few months to put in a new roundabout.

What else? Oh. Yes! The newsagent and the gift shops on the Victoria street were both broken into last week, and although no money was taken, the properties have suffered from some serious damage. Access was gained to these shops through the small alleyway at the back of the property. It’s dark and as you can imagine, nobody saw the thief or thieves in action. So, we’ve been advising shop owners long there about what kind of video recording equipment they can have put in. We’ll then be able to get evidence of any criminal activity on film.

The supermarket car park is also on out list of problem areas. We’ve talked to the supermarket managers and council authorities and we advised them to get graffiti cleaned off immediately and get the smashed light replaced. If you don’t deal with this sort of thing at once, there’s a strong possibility that the activivty will increase and spread, and then it becomes….

Ok. Moving on. Unfortunately, there’s been increase in the number of minor crimes and antisocial behaviour in a general area. And I want to talk about some specific prevention measures that are being proposed.

First of all, the skate park. As you probably know, it’s well used among younger people in our community, but unfortunately we are getting more and more reports of broken glass, making it especially dangerous for younger children. One possile solution here is to get rid of some of the trees and bushes around the park, making it more visible to passers-by and vehicles. If the vanes all known that they are being watched, this might act as a deterrent.

As you would have heard, a couple of local primary schools have also been vandalized recently despite the presence of the security guards. The schools don’t have the fund for video surveillance, so we need people in the neighborhood to call their nearest police station and report any suspicious activity immediately. Please don’t hesitate to do this.

I expect most of you are familiar with the problems facing Abbotsford Street. It seems that no amount of warning signs or speed cameras will slow speeding drivers down. I’m happy to say, however, that the council had a cree to begin work over the next few months to put in a new roundabout.

What else? Oh. Yes! The newsagent and the gift shops on the Victoria street were both broken into last week, and although no money was taken, the properties have suffered from some serious damage. Access was gained to these shops through the small alleyway at the back of the property. It’s dark and as you can imagine, nobody saw the thief or thieves in action. So, we’ve been advising shop owners long there about what kind of video recording equipment they can have put in. We’ll then be able to get evidence of any criminal activity on film.

The supermarket car park is also on out list of problem areas. We’ve talked to the supermarket managers and council authorities and we advised them to get graffiti cleaned off immediately and get the smashed light replaced. If you don’t deal with this sort of thing at once, there’s a strong possibility that the activivty will increase and spread, and then it becomes….

Matching 10D

Now we want all our visitors to have an exciting time when they come to the park but our first priority must be safety. Parents and guardians know their children’s behaviour and capabilities. But here at the park we have set certain conditions for each of the rides to ensure that all visitors get the maximum enjoyment out of the experience and feel secure at all times. There are four major rides at the park. Our newest ride is the River Adventure which is designed to reproduce the experience of white-water rafting. No amount of protective clothing would make any difference so only go on this ride if you’re prepared to get wet! Children under eight can go on this ride, but all under sixteens must have an adult with them.

Not all of our rides are designed for thrills and spills. Our Jungle Jim rollercoaster is a gentler version of the classic loop the loop, specially created for whole family enjoyment - from the smallest children to elderly grandparents, suitable for all levels of disability and health conditions. Carriages have comfortable seating for up to eight people, with safety belts for each passenger which must be worn at all times. Sit back and enjoy the scenery!

One of the best established and most popular of Camber’s rides is the massive Swoop Slide. Whizz down the polished vertical slide nine metres in height and scream to your heart’s content. There are no age or height restrictions. Be careful though - you must have on long trousers so you won’t get any speed burns!

And then there’s the famous Zip Go-kart stadium with sixteen carts: eight for single drivers and eight for kids preferring to ride along with mum, dad or carer. Take part in high-speed races in our specially designed Formula One-style karts - but no bumping other karts, please. All riders must be above one point two metres because they have to be able to reach the pedals ... even in the shared karts.

Full details of all safety features are available on our website at www.Camberspark.com.

So come and make a day of it at Camber’s Theme Park!

Section 4 - Practice 14

For my presentation, I’m going to summarise what I’ve found out about efforts to save one plant species ... the juniper bush. It once flourished in Britain and throughout the world’s temperate zones, but over the last few decades has declined considerably. Before I go on to explain the steps being taken to save it in England, let me start by looking at some background information and why the juniper has been so important in cultural as well as ecological terms, historically and in the present day.

Firstly, I want to emphasise the fact that juniper is a very ancient plant. It has been discovered that it was actually amongst the first species of plants to establish itself in Britain in the period following the most recent (31) Ice Age. And, as I say, it has a much valued place in British culture. It was used widely as a fuel during the Middle Ages because, when burnt, the smoke given off is all but (32) invisible and so any illicit activities involving fire could go on without being detected, for example, cooking game hunted illegally. It also has valuable medicinal properties. Particularly during large epidemics, oils were extracted from the juniper wood and sprayed in the air to try to prevent the spread of (33) infection in hospital wards. And these days, perhaps its most well known use is in cuisine...cooking, where its berries are a much-valued ingredient, used to (34) flavour a variety of meat dishes and also drinks.

Turning now to ecological issues, juniper bushes play an important role in supporting other living things. If juniper bushes are wiped out, this would radically affect many different insect and also (35) fungus species. We simply cannot afford to let this species die out.

So, why is the juniper plant declining at such a rapid rate? Well a survey conducted in the north and west of Britain in two thousand and four to five showed that a major problem is the fact that in present-day populations, ratios between the (36) sexes are unbalanced and without a proper mix of male and female, bushes don’t get pollinated. Also, the survey found that in a lot of these populations, the plants are the same age, so this means that bushes grow old and start to die at similar times leading to (37) swift extinction of whole populations.

Now, the charity Plantlife is trying to do something to halt the decline in juniper species. It’s currently trying out two new major salvage techniques, this time focusing on (38) lowland regions of England. The first thing it’s trying is to provide (39) shelters for the seedlings in areas where juniper populations are fairly well established. These, of course, are designed to help protect the plants at their most vulnerable stage. A further measure is that in areas where colonies have all but died out, numbers are being bolstered by the planting of (40) cuttings which have been taken from healthy bushes elsewhere.

Now, I hope I’ve given a clear picture of the problems facing this culturally and ecologically valuable plant and of the measures being taken by Plantlife to tackle them. If anyone has any questions, I’d be happy to ...

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